Bluestocking Journal

Real history, through the eyes of a fictional person

Tag: politics

Friday, December 27, 1912

At the Thursday meeting of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, the fact was brought out, quoted from unnamed eminent scientists, that 94 per cent of the criminal class are drunkards.

Governor Clark of Alaska is gloomy because there is a marked decrease in population in his territory, which he attributes to the falling off of mining, inadequate land laws, the prohibition against the killing of seals, and “the remarkable public calumnies about Alaska.” He is asking Congress to enact legislation permitting the working of the Alaskan coal lands.

The Kellogg Toasted Corn Flake company is charged with fixing prices in violation of the Sherman law. For some reason, seeing the headline “U.S. WARS ON CORN FLAKE MONOPOLY” made me giggle.

Thursday, December 12, 1912

Representative S. A. Roddenberry of Georgia has introduced a House resolution to “forbid the marriage of negroes and persons of any other color.” Angered by the recent marriage of “Jack” Johnson, a negro prize fighter, to Lucille Cameron, a white girl, in Chicago, Mr. Roddenberry spewed forth much vitriol. “We see an African with much brutal force, with no moral character, with no stamina, entering the office of a legal officer in that city, and calling on him to issue—’to Jack Johnson!’—a marriage license to wed a young American woman of our own blood, our own race, our own color. The young officer is directed to issue to the brute a legal certificate permitting a white woman in these days to be bound in the wedlock of black slavery.” Black slavery! He went on and on and on, apparently, and it looks as though the papers printed most of it. “No blacker incubus ever fixed itself upon the social politics of this republic than the embryonic cancer of negro marriage to white people that has lately been in evidence,” he emitted, probably turning redder and redder. “No more voracious parasite ever sucked at the heart of pure society and moral status than the one which welcomes or recognizes everywhere the sacred ties of wedlock between Africa and America.” What a horrible man. I feel sorry for his wife.

Meanwhile, Senator Benjamin F. Shively of Indiana disdained ether and chloroform before an operation in which his toe was to be removed. Instead, while it was being cut off, he smoked a cigar. I expect he hopes to be shot on his way to a speaking engagement so that he may give a speech while a bullet is in his chest, just like Theodore Roosevelt.

The Courier-Herald consulted various Urbana residents and came to the conclusion that the temperature last night dipped below zero. The headline is “MERCURY LOSES STANDING LOCALLY,” and below that, it says, “Weather Indicator Tries to Sneak Out of Bottom of Tube.”

Wednesday, November 27, 1912

There is a turkey famine in Centralia, Illinois! “Most of the housewives will have to serve the Thanksgiving spread minus this luxury.”

In Philadelphia, the National American Woman Suffrage association convention closed after adopting resolutions praising President Taft for appointing a woman as head of the national children’s bureau, commending the crusade against the traffic in women, and indorsing arbitration to prevent wars.

And speaking of woman suffrage, here is an advertisement for the talk that will be given here by Charlotte Perkins Gilman next month:

Friday, November 22, 1912

Suffrage will win, said Dr. Anna Howard Shaw, president of the National Woman Suffrage association, at the forty-fourth annual convention of that organization in Philadelphia. “Heretofore we had to inspire enthusiasm; now we have to hold it down,” she declared. The convention took place in historic Independence square, which was filled to its capacity, with men predominating.

A man near Murphysboro killed a bald eagle that had been stealing fowl and pigs. Its wingspan was six feet and nine inches.

In Hood River, Oregon, there is a hunt on for a big brown bear that raided a raspberry patch, destroyed an apiary, and entered a kitchen. When it entered the caretaker’s sleeping room, he dove out an open window by his bed. “The flapping of his night shirt waving an adieu so suddenly in the cool morning breeze frightened the bear, which turned over a cupboard of jams and canned fruits in its hasty exit through the pantry.”

Monday, November 18, 1912

Lester Noble, a Courier-Herald linotyper, was enjoying a late-night cigar at the Columbian hotel when he was drafted into service by Officer McClara of the police force. McClara whispered that there were burglars in Boyd’s bowling alley. “Noble’s luxuriant growth of hair began to protrude upward. ‘Let ’em burgle. I’m goin’ home,’ he said.” The officer insisted, though, and they made their way to the alley, where Noble fell over a box in the darkness and made a loud crash, warning the burglars, if there were any. “The praise Mr. Noble is receiving today is a soothing balm to his barked shins and fluttering nerves.”

A “suffragette army” completed its 400-mile walk from Edinburgh to London in five weeks. They went straight to Downing street to present a petition demanding suffrage for women, but “Premier Asquith, profiting from his experience of previous meetings with the vote-seeking women, had retired to the country.”

Wednesday, November 13, 1912

Am I the only one who finds typographical errors amusing? I was amazed to see that in this Kaufman & Company advertisement, they managed to spell “chrysanthemums” correctly but failed utterly at “Illinoisans,” “Champaign’s,” and “loyalty.” I don’t even know what to say about “There are FREE.”

A man in Benton, Illinois, purchased a revolver and vowed to kill all the “Bull Moosers” with whom he came in contact. First he entered a grocery store, but the weapon failed to discharge, and he was arrested and later adjudged insane and taken to the asylum.

In New York, the notorious suffragist Maud Malone was found guilty of wilfully disturbing a public meeting. When Woodrow Wilson spoke in the Brooklyn academy of Music on October 20, Miss Malone insisted on knowing his views on woman suffrage. “Since Mr. Wilson has never committed himself on that subject he evaded her question. Miss Malone insisted, and was arrested.”

What If Roosevelt Had Won in 1912?

Adolf Hitler might never have come into power, among other things.

Teddy Roosevelt And World War I: An Alternative History (Saturday Evening Post)

Saturday, November 9, 1912

The entire Champaign police force raided Hattie Gara’s notorious maison de joie at 201 North Water street in Champaign last night. Mrs. Gara, nine male patrons, and five female inmates were taken to the station. The patrons, whose names are listed in the paper, settled this morning for $7.50 each; Mrs. Gara and her girls await a hearing, but the usual fine is $27.50 for the proprietor and $17.50 for each girl.

A hardware store and a grocery were burglarized last night, although not much loot was taken: six razors, several knives, and a shaving brush from the hardware store, and nothing at all from the grocery, although a window had been pried open. The police have sent to Danville for bloodhounds.

A woman brought two boys who had been shooting pigeons into the Urbana police station. “Chief of Police Lindstrum disarmed them, taking an air rifle from one and a ‘nigger-shooter‘ from the other.”

The University of Illinois has opened a new archaeological museum in Lincoln Hall. Many interesting things are there, including the head of an Egyptian mummy!

A Chicago woman, the wife of a Democratic committeeman, sat in her home all night, reading election returns. She remarked, “I am glad Wilson won, because he is a good man.” A moment later, she fell dead, probably from strain caused by the election.

And finally, a hydroaeroplane beat an automobile in a race from Omaha to New Orleans. “The flying machine showed its ability to go about three miles to the automobile’s one, except when the automobile was using the best of roads.”

Thursday, November 7, 1912

An unknown negro shot “Red Ben” Barnett in the arm at Woody Mathews’ pool room on Market street in Champaign. “Red Ben” is a notorious bootlegger who was recently ordered to leave the Twin Cities and never return.

The Progressive party intends to put up candidates in every district for the 1914 election, when a new house of representatives will be elected. Said Colonel Roosevelt, “The Progressive party has superseded the Republican party. All we need to do is to keep steadily on with the fight and we will win.” Fight, fight, fight. Reading all of this news just makes it clear to me that politics is too important to be left in the hands of the men.

Champaign County Election Returns

Here is a table showing the final tally of votes by district in the 1912 election, as published in the Urbana Courier-Herald on November 7, 1912.