Bluestocking Journal

Real history, through the eyes of a fictional person

Tag: Danville

Friday, December 6, 1912

Seventeen-year-old Elsie Slade, of Urbana, was taken into custody as a runaway in Danville. She had run away with two girls who had been visiting in Champaign. “They were arrested by a detective, who recognized the Wilson girl as unfit company for a lass of Miss Slade’s appearance.” Miss Wilson was arrested a couple of weeks ago, “following an encounter in a resort.”

In Quincy, a decree of divorce was granted to a fifteen-year-old mother of three children. She was married three years ago, and the charge was desertion.

The first jury of women in Idaho is apparently guilty of an “odd stunt,” because the hearing was adjourned while the jurors prepared the midday meals for their families, and they reached their verdict (finding a woman guilty of threatening a man with a revolver) in less than an hour.

Finally, there is a report from London that militant suffragettes decided at a recent meeting to blow up the lower house of Parliament if the government fails to adopt woman suffrage in a forthcoming bill, “according to a statement issued by a news agency.”

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Monday, November 11, 1912

The unsuccessful grocery-store burglar from Friday night returned during the day Sunday and stole about $2 from the cash register. The Danville bloodhounds failed to arrive Friday, but last evening dogs arrived from Paxton and followed a trail to the vicinity of the Champaign gas house, where they lost the scent.

Five hold-ups occurred in Champaign Saturday evening, with particularly bad results for a wealthy retired farmer, who was knocked unconscious and sustained severe scalp wounds. The perpetrators are believed to be two well-dressed white men. The robberies occurred on North Walnut street, on East Main street, and in the Washington street subway.

A motorcyclist drove his machine through the ranks of the Odd Fellows attending the funeral of Andrew J. Dunlap at the First Christian church yesterday, as they prepared to leave for the Mount Hope cemetery. The man was recognized, and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

I had no idea that the Urbana youth football team was called the Microbes. They were beaten 44 to 0 yesterday by the Champaign Stars on the Lynn street gridiron. Perhaps they ought to change their name to something larger.

Tuesday, October 22, 1912

The Urbana progressives have this to say today: “Fellow voters, in the coming election let us forget our old party traditions that made us vote for Satan himself if he bore the right party label. Let us be men for once and all and show our manhood and good common sense by casting our ballot for Theodore [Roosevelt], the greatest man now living.” Col. Roosevelt indeed seems like a great man, but is that the quality that makes a good president? If I were able to cast a vote, I would still be making up my mind about it all. I suppose I would vote based on the issue that seemed to me most important, which now is woman suffrage … and of course that wouldn’t be an issue if I were allowed to vote!

An aged Urbana man named Charles Judd went to Danville on Sunday. He attempted to board an I.T.S. car to return home, but the conductor would not let him on, owing to his intoxicated condition. Mr. Judd angrily hurled a whiskey bottle at the conductor. “Then he ran, and, although an old man, gave two policemen a good race around the public square.” He is now being held on a charge of assault.

Friday, October 18, 1912

Francis Ganalon, the “wild man” who took possession of a house in Tolono and who claimed to own all of the public buildings and farmland in this county, has escaped from the asylum for the insane. As Mr. Ganalon tends not to keep such a low profile, I believe we have not heard the last of him.

“A wild-eyed stranger, hatless and poorly clothed and excitedly claiming to have witnessed a frightful train wreck,” appeared at the Johnson residence just south of Sidney early this morning. Sidney officers brought the stranger, who first gave his name as Con Graney and later as Dan Conley, to Urbana, where he was adjudged insane. The prisoner imagined himself to be in Chicago. Although clad in the attire of a common laborer, the mystery man has a refined face, and his hands are small and uncalloused. “The rough exterior does not disguise the refined and intellectual appearance of the man and the authorities are considerably puzzled.”

Myrtle Bowers, employed in a knitting mill, put her name and address into a stocking before it was shipped. A Florida man bought the stocking, the two corresponded, and they were married in Rockford, Illinois.

George R. Lunn, Socialist mayor of Schenectady, New York, and six of his Socialist co-workers have been arrested on a charge of rioting and thrown in jail in Little Falls. The mayor, his wife, and a number of others had attempted to address groups of striking employees in the streets there without a permit.

Monday, October 14, 1912

A mysterious woman has stricken terror in two households in Urbana by suddenly appearing at the window and fixing each person with a piercing gaze before gliding away slowly. “Peeping Jane” has snow-white hair and a pale, drawn countenance, and she is believed to be a maniac. “Women and children of the neighborhood she infests are keeping close indoors after nightfall and the men admit that they are not feeling any too cheerful over her visits.”

The Piatt county sheriff was in Urbana today with a Miss Dove in custody, enroute to the home for incorrigible girls at Geneva. She was declared a delinquent, and she is the same girl responsible for the imprisonment of a former ITS agent who is now serving a term at Chester for an alleged criminal assault upon her. During the trial, he denied his guilt, claiming that the girl had made indecent advances.

In Danville, an amateur detective heard a farmer remark that the Talarigo murder case of that city would never be solved, upon which the “detective” (actually a machinist) arrested the farmer. He took him to police headquarters, where each man was fined $3 and costs for being drunk.