Bluestocking Journal

Real history, through the eyes of a fictional person

Tag: cemeteries

Saturday, December 28, 1912

Local antiquities are now on display in the rotunda of the Champaign postoffice, including an old envelope bearing the postmark of West Urbana, the original name of Champaign. It is dated April 8, 1856.

A silver dollar was found in the brain of the father who was killed, along with his family, in the horrible Christmas train accident. The portion of the skull in which resided the dollar was overlooked at first, having been flung to a different location. “The coin will be kept by relatives as a sad, as well as curious, memento of the fatality.” The little girl who survived has regained consciousness and is improving; her first words upon awakening were, “Hurrah for Santa Claus!” The family was buried today in a single grave at Mount Hope cemetery.

A sixteen-year-old girl has confessed to having set fire to the same Brooklyn building seven times. “I don’t know why I did it, only I just love to watch the flames. The blaze is so pretty,” she said. “But I do not mean any harm by it.”

Advertisements

Wednesday, December 11, 1912

This story is so very sad!

“Sterling, Dec. 11—Consigned to a hut in the middle of the cemetery Ralph Hitch of Morrison has been left to live or die as the case may be. Hitch is dangerously ill of smallpox which is infecting the western part of the county. Being a batchelor, Hitch had no place to go when he was taken ill and the city having no pest house search was made for a suitable place. The only available building was an abandoned hut in the cemetery. Here the officials left him, placing groceries and fuel within his reach. No one can be found to attend him and he has been left alone with only the tombstones as companions, to fight out as best he may his battle for life.”

Thursday, November 14, 1912

James Cain, a farmer, appeared at the Lewis store where Margaret Lowry works as a bookkeeper and asked to escort her home. Months earlier she had rejected him, and so she refused, but he persisted until she agreed. On South Randolph street near her home, he exclaimed, “This is a good place,” and hit her twice on the back of the head with a hammer. Her condition is critical. The mangled body of her attacker, which could only be identified by his ring and hat, was found scattered along the Illinois Central track; it is believed to be a suicide.

James Eaton, the man who went mad with drink on election day and tried to kill a man at the polling place, was arrested yesterday. He was at the side of his dying baby and pleaded to be allowed to stay, but he was taken to the jail.

A Chicago woman was placing lighted blessed candles on the graves of relatives, when her clothing caught fire. A man ran to her and wrapped her in his overcoat, quenching the flames, but she was fatally injured.

After those stories of horror, I don’t know what to make of this next one. At first I thought it might be a made-up story because of the names. In Philadelphia, Magistrate Coward decided that it is no crime to call a policeman a “gink.” Policeman Pill of the vice squad had arrested Jack Hanlon, a former pugilist, whom he accused of calling him a gink while Pill was on duty. Said the judge, “I’m called worse things than that a dozen times a day. I don’t care how you take it. If that is all that the man said you had no right to arrest him.” During cross-examination by Hanlon’s lawyer, Pill admitted that he did not even know what the word meant.

Monday, November 11, 1912

The unsuccessful grocery-store burglar from Friday night returned during the day Sunday and stole about $2 from the cash register. The Danville bloodhounds failed to arrive Friday, but last evening dogs arrived from Paxton and followed a trail to the vicinity of the Champaign gas house, where they lost the scent.

Five hold-ups occurred in Champaign Saturday evening, with particularly bad results for a wealthy retired farmer, who was knocked unconscious and sustained severe scalp wounds. The perpetrators are believed to be two well-dressed white men. The robberies occurred on North Walnut street, on East Main street, and in the Washington street subway.

A motorcyclist drove his machine through the ranks of the Odd Fellows attending the funeral of Andrew J. Dunlap at the First Christian church yesterday, as they prepared to leave for the Mount Hope cemetery. The man was recognized, and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

I had no idea that the Urbana youth football team was called the Microbes. They were beaten 44 to 0 yesterday by the Champaign Stars on the Lynn street gridiron. Perhaps they ought to change their name to something larger.